Blog: News & Views from the Field

Knowledge can be empowering. Whether you are seeking recovery for yourself or someone else, we hope you find our blog topics helpful. Check back often or subscribe today.

Prisons as a Launch Pad

At this point in history when there is a growing consensus for prison reform, we have an opportunity for making systemic change that can impact great numbers of inmates by re-envisioning prisons as “launch pads” for success. We believe this is feasible through a well-designed integration of the self-help therapeutic community (TC) model and a strong network of community and prison training resources within a correctional system that is primed for prison reform and reentry success.
Continue reading

Spectrum Health Systems, Inc. Opposes the Legalization of Marijuana

Since 1969, Spectrum Health Systems has been dedicated to providing cutting-edge addiction treatment, helping hundreds of thousands of individuals achieve sobriety and reclaim their lives. During this time, we’ve seen first-hand the profound devastation that often occurs as a result of addiction.
Continue reading

Multiple Pathways Exist to Support Long-Term Recovery

For most individuals suffering from addiction, recovery is a lifelong process. Addiction is a chronic disease and relapse is an ever-present threat. Some individuals find that it’s helpful to access multiple pathways when it comes to supporting their sobriety.
Continue reading

Licensure and Accreditation of Substance Abuse Treatment Programs

While licensure and accreditation may not be the first things on your mind when researching an addiction treatment facility for you or a loved one, they are some of the many tools Spectrum Health Systems uses to ensure compliance with regulations and the most current best practices. Because of the importance we place on licensure and accreditation, we asked Spectrum’s Quality Assurance team to explain the various types of licensure and accreditation Spectrum relies upon to ensure that we’re providing the best possible treatment to all our clients.

Continue reading

A Father’s Letter: What I’ve Learned at Learn to Cope

Learn to Cope is a non-profit support network funded by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health that offers education, resources, peer support and hope for parents and family members coping with a loved one’s addiction to opiates or other drugs.

Founded by Joanne Peterson in 2004, the organization has become a nationally recognized model for peer support with more than 7,000 members and numerous chapters located throughout Massachusetts. We often refer parents to this important resource knowing they’ll be in the company of individuals who can relate to the needs of a parent looking for answers and support.

Continue reading

Opioid Abuse Law Deserves Applause

Governor Baker’s signing of legislation this week to combat the opioid epidemic represents an important step in the fight to end this ongoing tragedy. Today, on average four individuals a day in Massachusetts die from a fatal overdose of opiates. Non-fatal overdoses are as much as three to four times higher than that number each day, with most of these overdoses affecting young adults between 18 and 30 years of age. The strain on police and emergency responders is overwhelming for most communities. At Spectrum Health Systems we are experiencing an unprecedented demand for addiction treatment services at all levels — residential, inpatient and outpatient.
Continue reading

Understanding Spectrum’s Outpatient Opioid Treatment - Part 2

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is available at Spectrum’s numerous outpatient treatment centers located throughout Massachusetts. Clients will receive a comprehensive clinical assessment, complete medical evaluation, medical monitoring, daily onsite dispensing, individualized treatment planning, educational services, and individual, group and/or family counseling. Active treatment planning and support services are also available to help ensure sustained recovery.

Spectrum offers same-day MAT admission according to a set schedule. This allows clients to complete the intake process and, if appropriate, receive their first treatment.
Continue reading

Understanding Spectrum’s Outpatient Treatment for Opioid Addiction - Part 1: What is Medication-Assisted Treatment

The process where one becomes addicted to either opiates or opioids is very complex, involving significant changes to the brain in the areas responsible for processing pleasure. Even an individual committed to quitting the use of these drugs will likely find it difficult due to associated cravings and the fear of withdrawal. But like any chronic disease, treatment is available.

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is a highly effective form of treatment for opioid addiction. MAT includes the use of medications along with counseling and support from family and friends. It is available on an outpatient basis which allows individuals to remain productive while working to change problematic behaviors. Medications such as methadone and buprenorphine, opioids which effectively “trick” the brain into thinking it’s receiving the problem drug, or naltrexone which blocks the effects of problem drugs, are most commonly prescribed.
Continue reading

Understanding Spectrum’s Levels of Inpatient Care

At Spectrum we spend a significant amount of time thinking about, and planning our services to ensure the most complete continuum of care possible for our clients. We wanted to take a moment to describe the various levels of care found in our Massachusetts based inpatient programing, and show how each level can be a beneficial component of the recovery process.

Acute Detoxification Treatment
Continue reading

Heroin Use In New England

Beginning in the 1990’s, availability and abundance of powerful opioid painkillers led to a new population struggling with opioid addiction throughout New England. While regulatory efforts to reduce the supply of painkillers entering the illicit market were often successful, heroin quickly became a substitute for prescription opioids as its price saw dramatic decreases over the last decade. Heroin is a highly addictive drug that continues to contribute to the staggering number of drug overdoses in New England.

Continue reading